Monthly Archives: June 2016

Radio Cat

My friend Jim Baum owns a local radio station. We met several years ago when I was a wet-behind-the-ears editor and he was mayor. With a long history of radio broadcasting behind him, Jim became my mentor, teaching me how to manoeuvre my way through small town politics, to become comfortable conversing with movers and shakers, and to ask good, investigative questions.

However, this blog isn’t about my journalist friend….it’s about his cat. Squeak has been taking care of the radio station for as long as Jim has been there. Whether Squeak came with the station or moved in right along with Jim is something I’ve never learned. Squeak is there at 5:30 a.m. every morning to greet Jim and “open up” shop. She seldom ventures outside, preferring to prowl the small three to four room station 24-7. She greets visitors with feline elegance and graciousness and during most of Jim’s interviews at the station she supervises from his desk in a prominent position between interviewer and interviewee. To a lucky few, she extends the honor of a personal “cat bath”.

As any cat person knows, cats tend to make their presence known and felt without saying a word. The last time I was in the station, Squeak sat quietly on the floor at my feet letting me know in no uncertain terms I had usurped her chair. I quickly shared and was reward with the privilege of scratching her chin and ears.

Cats are highly intelligent creatures and every so often one seems to enjoy being intimately involved in the writing process. Squeak supervises Jim’s creative process, adding a comment now and again when he pays more attention to writing than to her.

It’s been awhile since I’ve had a cat that shared my love of writing. Long, long ago in a town far, far away, we had a Siamese cat who felt I couldn’t write anything unless she was perched on my shoulders or the back of the desk chair. I have author friends who sometimes moan about their cats hijacking their stories by walking across the keyboard or getting between them and the computer screen. But let’s face it, where would we be without our furry muses? There is something soothing and creative about a purring cat, and even when they are not purring, the simple act of stroking their silky fur has often jumpstarted a story or idea.

Here’s to long life to all radio and writing cats…wherever they may be.

 

 

 

 

 

Simple Solution

After a visit to the Pacific War Museum in Fredricksburg last week, Bruce and I decided to rent the movie PT 109, an excellent film, made all the better since it was based on a true story. The heroism displayed during that time period got me wondering if we have any young people with the same grit and determination as those young men who gave their lives during WW II, as well as wondering about the underlying differences between that generation and the present one.

With the rise in juvenile crime and delinquency, I realized there is a radical, yet simple solution to transforming our youth culture: require every high school-college age student to complete six months in the Peace Corps. Most of our disenfranchisement among today’s youth is due to ingratitude and lack of anything meaningful in their lives. Not only would a six month to year long stint in the Peace Corps fill that gap, but it would produce a sense of accomplishment in their lives that, frankly, working at a fast food join flipping burgers doesn’t.

We can take this even  further. Instead of sentencing juvenile offenders to a stint in the prison system (where they learn to be worse, not better), require them to serve their time in the Peace Corps. Yes, I know President Kennedy’s dream was to send the best America had to offer overseas, but most of these delinquents have the potential for greatness, yet lacked the opportunity to discover it. Giving of themselves in a place far less fortunate than anywhere they may have grown up in the United States provides the chance for them to discover who they really are.

Think about the costs of keeping a young delinquent in the prison system versus the costs of the minimal stipend in the Peace Corps. Not only does the US benefit from reduced costs of imprisonment, but the other country benefits in terms of service and income (the youngsters have to eat, pay rent, and enjoy some free time); in addition, the young person has gainful employment instead of sitting in a jail cell thinking of more ways to get into mischief.

It’s a win-win for everyone.

 

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